Final Prompt – Erasing Differences for the Sake of Inclusion: How Mexican/Mexican American Students Construct Historical Narratives

Regarding the Santiago reading, do these two things after thoughtfully reading the 17-ish assigned pages (described in your email):

1) On your site, post 4 questions from/about the text by class on Thursday April 27th; two close-ended questions that can be answered factually about the essence of piece and two open-ended questions that require extended analysis and/or practical application. Don’t try to be fancy, just ask your peers to make helpful and real-world connections. Dig it?
2) Respond to your assigned peers Q’s by Sunday, April 30th by 11:59pm. Note that we are giving you plenty of extra time to help you plan around your other assignments and responsibilities for the exam.

Here are the peer groups:

  • Lindsey – Daylon
  • Asher – Jordan
  • Joe – Ally
  • Justin – Caleb
  • Reggie – Meghan
  • Andy – Ashley
  • Malissa – Adam

16 Personalities

Screen Shot 2017-03-24 at 8.40.52 PMTo truly grow as professionals, it’s not only important to understand curriculum and the landscape of education, but also to realize how your unique wiring predisposes you to interact with students, authorities, parents, information, and policies.

By class time on Wednesday, (1) read this blurb about the test’s theory to understand the nature of this personality test and (2) take the personality test. Once you have taken the test, (3) respond (on your page) in a few paragraphs to these prompts:

  1. What personality type are you? Describe what that means (in a paragraph or two).
  2. What professional advantages does your personality type have for being a social studies teacher?
  3. What professional disadvantages does your personality type have for being a social studies teacher?

Teaching Social Responsibility

First, recall our discussion from Monday, that in the realm of ethics/morality, there are both descriptive (how things are) claims and normative or prescriptive (how things ought to be) claims…

Read The Courage to Teach Social Responsibility from pages 189-197 (you can stop at the Creating Change heading) and answer these questions on your site by class on Wednesday.

1. In a few sentences, what (according to the text) is “social responsibility” and why does it take courage to teach social responsibility?

2.In a few sentences… of the “four basic processes that nurture social responsibility”(see page 192), which process(es) do you believe to be most important in forming socially responsible citizens? Explain.

2. In 2-3 few paragraphs… how do different people (who have different values and fundamental understandings of justice, truth, & etc.) disagree about what values to promote and pursue? What do you think about pursuing a common vision when there isn’t a consensus?

4. In 3-4 paragraphs… offer your own stance: what does it mean to be ethical/moral in a descriptive and normative sense? How have you come to that conclusion/what is that based on?

Moral, Believing Animals

smithQ’s: What is morality? Is morality real? Is there a basis for morality? How do we make sense of & justify moral & ethical claims & assessments?

Moral, Believing Animals: Human Personhood and Culture by Christian Smith, PhD. Abstract:

What kind of animals are human beings? And how do our visions of the human shape our theories of social action and institutions? This book offers answers to these and other fundamental questions in sociological, cultural, and religious theories. The research for this book is based on the assumption (unfashionable in certain circles) that human beings have an identifiable and peculiar set of capacities and proclivities that distinguishes them significantly from other animals on this planet. It argues that all people are at bottom believers, whose lives, actions, and institutions are constituted, motivated, and governed by narrative traditions and moral orders on which they inescapably depend. Despite the vast differences in humanity between cultures and across history, no matter how differently people narrate their lives and histories, there remains an underlying structure of human personhood that helps to order human culture, history, and narration. Drawing on recent insights in moral philosophy, epistemology, and narrative studies, the book argues that humans are animals who have an inescapable moral and spiritual dimension. They cannot avoid a fundamental moral orientation in life and this, the book says, has profound consequences for how sociology must study human beings. Continue reading “Moral, Believing Animals”

Night Prompt #1, Peer Question

Your prompt this week functions in three parts:

  • First, read the Forward through the first 47 pages of Night.
  • Second, and imagining that you will be leading a class discussion on Night for students in your placement, come up with and post four thoughtful discussion questions on the book on your own page. These questions must be original, open-ended, and designed to foster higher-order thinking about the text and relevant connections.
  • Finally, after posting these questions by Wednesday (2/15), respond to your partner (assigned below) in a few paragraphs… choose just one of their questions, and post a reply by class time on Thursday (2/17).

Continue reading “Night Prompt #1, Peer Question”

Teaching the Holocaust (& Night)

concentration-campsBy the start of next Thursday’s class (2/9), READ both Schweber’s Holocaust Fatigue: Teaching it Today and this NY Times article, The Holocaust Just Got More Shocking. Also, if you can make the time, you should check out the US Holocaust Museum as well.

DO THIS: See what group you’re in (click on “Continue reading” below) and respond to the corresponding three prompts in a few sentences on your page by class time on Thursday (2/9). The following readings and reflection will set us up nicely to transition into Night, by Eli Wiesel …which we’ll begin to read next week.

Continue reading “Teaching the Holocaust (& Night)”